El Hierro Island – ‘The End of the World’

El Hierro, which was formed around 1.2 million years ago, is affectionately known as ‘Isla del Meridiano’ (the ‘Meridian Island’), and it is the smallest and farthest south and west of the Canary Island archipelago. Just like the other Canary Islands El Hierro is mountainous and volcanic, and only one eruption (which lasted around four weeks) has ever been recorded on the island, which came from the Volcan de Lomo Negro vent in 1793. However, at least three major landslides have affected El Hierro in the last few hundred thousand years, the most recent of these was the ‘El Golfo’ landslide that occurred about 15 thousand years ago. The indigenous people are descendants of the ancient Bimbache tribes, who worshipped the sacred garoe evergreen tree, which produces water from its leaves. Before Christopher Columbus discovered the Americas (which was actually an accident, because he was originally sailing in search of a new route to India, when he discovered them -hence he named the islands ‘The West Indies’), the south-western tip of El Hierro was considered to be ‘The end of the world’.

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Fuerteventura – ‘The Solitude Isle’

With a landmass area of 641 square miles (1,660 sq. km) Fuerteventura is one of the largest of the Canary islands, second-only to Tenerife. It is also the oldest island in the archipelago, dating back around 20 million years. The island lies on the same latitude as Florida and Mexico, and so the temperature rarely falls below 18 °C (64 °F) -or rises above 32 °C (90 °F). There are 152 beaches along its coastline, 50 km (31 miles) of which are fine, white sand, whereas the other 25 km (16 miles) are made-up of black volcanic shingle. Fuerteventura also has the driest climate of all the Canary Islands, barely getting any rainfall at all.

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The Mystical Island of Lanzarote.

Hello once again -and welcome to the clearbluetenerife blog, where we are currently looking at the other ‘6’ major islands which surround our beloved island of Tenerife. ‘La Gomera’ was the first on the list, as it is the closest island to Tenerife, followed by the island of La Palma, which is only a few hour’s ferry ride from Tenerife’s southern coast. Today we will be broadening our horizons, as we travel in a north-easterly direction to the island of Lanzarote, where I will give you a brief insight into one of the most popular islands in the Canaries, along with a short excerpt from my personal travel-journal which I wrote during my circumnavigation of the islands a few years ago.

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La Palma Island

Last month (September 15th, to be precise) I wrote a blog about the island of La Gomera, saying how surprised I was that more tourists didn’t take a day or two out of their holidays to visit this beautiful island, which is literally a hop, skip and a jump from the island of Tenerife. I also said that I would be writing about all of the other main islands (La Palma, El Hierro, Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and Gran Canaria) in the coming months, as all of them are within easy sailing distances from Tenerife, albeit one or two of them being accessed by overnight ferries, as the sailing times do run into double figures -but for any cruising fans who are reading this, then that would be a walk-in-the-park to them.

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Mount Teide -The highest mountain in Spain

I first came to Tenerife back in March 1984, as one of the millions of tourists who flood the island each year, primarily to escape the harshness of the British winter, and to enjoy the warmth and sunshine that this wonderful sub-tropical island has to offer. The flight was a very sedate affair, but it was only when we began our descent onto the island that this great beacon suddenly appeared through my window, amidst a grey and misty sky, its majestic peak standing tall above a blanket of cotton-wool cloud. This was ‘Mount Teide’, the highest volcano in the whole of Spain, welcoming its latest visitors to its homeland -a land that has a thousand tales to tell, but none more exciting than the story of the true ruler of Tenerife -the Armageddon of this Atlantic archipelago of paradise islands.

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‘Sister Act – The Musical’

At the end of this year Tenerife will be opening its doors to a stage production of ‘Sister Act’, a hilariously-funny film, which was one of the most financially successful movies of the early 1990’s -and a film that has also been rated number ’83’ on Bravo’s ‘The 100 Funniest Movies’ list. Such was the movie’s success, that within a year the sequel: ‘Sister Act 2: back in the habit’ was released, which likewise became a box-office smash. Over a dozen years later -in 2006 to be exact, the musical, ‘Sister Act’ premiered at the Pasadena Playhouse in California, before opening at the West End’s London Palladium in 2009. In April 2011 the musical opened on Broadway at the Broadway Theatre, and as we stand today it has been performed in no-less than ’12’ countries, having played to over ‘four million’ spectators -in ‘seven’ different languages. Based on the movie, this stage interpretation of the film will be coming to Tenerife over the New Year, as the ‘Winter festive-season Special’ at the Adan Martin Auditorium in Santa-Cruz.

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Canary Islands Surf Film Festival 2015

Move-over Cannes, London and New York, because between the 8th and 11th October 2015 Tenerife will welcome to its shores the “Canary Islands Surf Film Festival” -a truly magnificent sporting event which will include surf-riders from all over the world. Passion for the environment, the influence of the trade winds, waves born on the ocean floor and rich biodiversity, have made the Canary Islands an ideal location for the world’s top photography, film and advertising directors in the adventurous and adrenaline-flowing world of surfing, windsurfing, kite-surfing and body-boarding. Turismo de Canarias will be announcing the winner of this magnanimous event during the ‘Canarias Surf Film Festival 2016’.

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Entertainers in Tenerife -John G. with his ‘Wet, Wet, Wet’ Tribute Act

Jon ‘G’ (the ‘G’ simply stands for ‘Gibson’) was born on 25th January 1963, in ‘Lennox Castle Hospital’ in Lennox town, East Dunbartonshire, Scotland -an establishment with a rather lurid past regarding its mentally disturbed inmates “Which kind of suits me to a tee”, Jon joked, as we began our interview at the Clear Blue Skies offices in Playa Fanabe. Jon, who has never been married, and has no children, spent the best part of his childhood moving around Scotland with his two sisters (one older and one younger) and his parents, until sadly their father passed-away aged only 49. John has always had a love for music, playing the coronet and trumpet as a schoolboy, which unfortunately included being continually bullied by his peers, who took great pleasure in kicking him and spitting at him in-between lessons and after school.

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Ronnie J, Haynes -A True Entertainer

‘Ronnie J. Haynes’ is a name synonymous with the word ‘Entertainment’ here in sunny Tenerife; just ask anyone in the business -or his multitude of fans, who have simply adored this guy’s magical voice, along with his never-ending smile, his unmitigated charm -and an unequalled charisma that has wowed audiences the world-over for over half a century. Ronnie is simply ‘The Perfect Gentleman’ both on and off stage, and having been a close friend of his for over 17 years, I can say unequivocally that this mans personality has not changed one iota from the day we first met -no matter what may be going-on in the background. Ronnie is a true professional. “What a lucky guy, to have lived such a charmed life”, I have heard one-or-two people say after speaking with him, the cardinal of all sins, envy, creeping slightly into they minds, having seen the adoration that is bestowed upon him after every show that he performs -and yet in reality nothing could be further from the truth!

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Jeep Safari’s from Tenerife to La Gomera

It is amazing how many tourists / holiday-makers come to the island of Tenerife year after year -and yet the majority of them never even consider popping across to its neighbouring island of La Gomera. With a ferry-crossing that takes around 45 minutes -which is roughly the same time that it takes to cross from Portsmouth to the Isle of Wight in the UK, embarking on a simple day-trip to this wonderful little island, which is steeped in history -and has an abundance of beauty, seems par-for-the-course in my eyes -and so I hope that this little insight into the second-smallest island in the Canary Islands archipelago will be an incentive for people to embark on their first-ever island-hopping adventure off the north-western coast of Africa.

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